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National Security and Immigration Reform

February 15, 2012

With all of the discussion about national security, new state level immigration legislation is actually making it easier, not harder, for violent criminals to penetrate the U.S. borders.

If you need help with an Immigration matter in NY, contact Susan B. Henner now at 914-358-5200 or by email at Susan@sbhenner.com

“Immigration and National Security: The Illusion of Safety Through Local Law Enforcement Action”

Abstract:
Despite efforts to reform immigration law in the 1980s and the 1990s, the new laws passed in those decades by the Congress did not solve the long-term problems raised by undocumented people entering the United States. The issue arose anew after the terrorist attacks of September, 2001. While the advocates for immigration crackdowns in the 1980s and 1990s had cast the issue as one of economics and cultural transformation, immigration opponents after 9/11 painted a different picture: illegal immigration, they said, was a national security issue. If poor farmers from Mexico and Central America could sneak into the U.S. across the southwestern border, so could potential terrorists. This “re-branding” of illegal immigration gained significant traction on the national level, but resulted in no federal legislation. The immigration debate has now moved to the state level, with the focus on state laws such as Arizona’s SB 1070. These state laws have brought about something long sought by immigration opponents that they failed to attain in the national debates: local and state law enforcement agencies are now obligated to question people they stop about immigration status. While national security has not been the primary motivation of state lawmakers, the ironic result of these state laws will be a decrease in security against terrorists who might try to penetrate the land borders of the U.S.

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